Seth’s Blog : Just because you can doesn’t mean you should

Just because you can doesn’t mean you should

It might be a market you can enter, but that doesn’t mean it will reward your time and effort.

It might be an all-you-can-eat situation, but there’s a difference between all you can eat and all you care to eat.

You might be kindly invited to participate, to weigh in or to engage…

But that doesn’t require you to change your priorities, to exchange the important for the urgent.

Why we write tickets

Found on Hackernoon.   We are switching how our department is organized and will need to increase our use of JIRA tickets.  

Why we write tickets

  • So if we get sick, a teammate can help us out
  • To help us decompose our work into small pieces
  • As a placeholder for a real-life conversation
  • To keep track of how we resolved the issue
  • To make our standups effective
  • To point out dependencies
  • To reflect on the mix/makeup of our work during retros
  • Self-discipline. Don’t take on too much. Try to do one thing at a time

Why we DON’T write tickets

  • To track our time
  • To compete with other team members
  • To show managers we’re busy
  • To make managing people possible
  • To report status, or % complete
  • Because Jira is fun to use
  • External discipline

Seth’s Blog : Whose business are you minding?

Whose business are you minding?

Industries have rules. Rules and benefits.

Hollywood requires agents, casting calls, big budgets and content aimed at a certain part of a certain market. If you follow enough of the rules, the thinking goes, you get a multi-million dollar budget and the red carpet.

Broadway requires a certain length, certain compromises, certain deals. This creates scalpers and hangers on and small audiences filling small theaters. And, if you follow just enough of the rules, you might end up with Hamilton. Perhaps one in 10,000 pull this off.

Publishing requires a fealty to the book and to the bookstore, alliances with the right cultural forces and a willingness to create scarcity. If you’re persistent and very, very good, you can get picked by the New Yorker and you get picked by Little, Brown and you end up with The Tipping Point. Perhaps one in 100,000 pull this off.

Outsiders who want in, who want to make their mark in movies or investment banking or in politics often decide that minding the business of their industry is the way to reach their goals. After all, it’s the insiders that win the awards and get the benefits that go to people who are by and for their industry.

But what if instead of focusing on the industry, you focused on the change you seek to make? On the audience you seek to serve. On doing your customers’ business, not the industry’s…

It’s not in any of the manuals, but the door is wide open, the path is far wider and you can start today.

More from Seth Godin’s Blog : Creating discomfort

More from Seth Godin’s Blog,   :

Creating discomfort

If you’re seeking to create positive change in your community, it’s almost certain you’ll be creating discomfort as well.

Want to upgrade the local playground? It sounds like it will be universally embraced by parents and everyone who cares about kids. Except that you now bring up issues of money, of how much is enough, of safety. Change is uncomfortable.

It’s way easier to talk about today’s weather, or what you had for lunch.

Usually, when we’re ready to launch something, we say, “this is going to help people, this is well crafted, I’m proud of it.”

What’s a lot more difficult (but useful) is to say all of that plus, “and this is going to make (some) people uncomfortable.”

 

Quote to Ponder: Charlie Munger

We try more to profit from always remembering the obvious than from grasping the esoteric. It is remarkable how much long-term advantage people like us have gotten by trying to be consistently not stupid, instead of trying to be very intelligent.”
-Charlie Munger